We like to post anything that's spooky, haunted, abandoned or fun.

Tuesday, April 29, 2008


This is the remastered version with newer music.
An unauthorized production of Bram Stoker's work (The legal heirs didn't give their permission), so the names had to be changed. But this wasn't enough: The widow of Bram Stoker won two lawsuits (1924 and 1929) in which she demanded the destruction of all copies of the movie, however happily copies of it were already too widespread to destroy them all. Later, the Universal studios could break her resistance against this movie. Count Orlok's move to Wisburg (Obviously the real "Wismar") brings the plague traceable to his dealings with the Realtor Thomas Hutter, and the Count's obsession with Hutter's wife, Ellen the only one with the power to end the evil.


The character Orlok is never seen blinking on screen.

Max Schreck is seen on screen, even before his character Graf Orlok is presented to the audience. He appears briefly opposite Hutter at the desk at the office of Knock, looking up from writing when Knock calls on Hutter to give him the assignment of going to see the count.

Filmed between August and October 1921.

Many scenes featuring Graf Orlok were filmed during the day, and when viewed in black and white, this becomes extremely obvious. This potential blooper is corrected when the "official" versions of the movie are tinted blue to represent night.

Ruth Landshoff, the actress who played the hero's sister once described a scene in which she fled the vampire, running along a beach. That scene is not in any version of the film.

The character of Nosferatu is only seen on screen for a bit less than nine minutes in total throughout the whole film.

All known prints and negatives were destroyed under the terms of settlement of a lawsuit by Bram Stoker's widow. However, the film would subsequently surface in other countries.

The only complete, original copy is said to be owned by the German Max Schreck collector Jens Geutebrück.

Director F.W. Murnau found Max Schreck "strikingly ugly" in real life and decided the vampire makeup would suffice with just pointy ears and false teeth.

The creature that they say is a werewolf, during the scene at the Inn, is actually a Hyena.

Gustav von Wangenheim was not director F.W. Murnau's first or even his second choice, but his third one.

The movie was banned in Sweden due to excessive horror. The ban was finally lifted in 1972

Still, after 85 years, virtually all of the exteriors are left intact in the cities of Wismar and Lubeck.

There have been different first names for the main characters in different English versions. In a few, Hutter is called "Thomas", in others is "Jonathon". Although Hutter's wife is credited as "Ellen", in some versions she is called "Nina".

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